Walk-In Information

ATTENTION: Our services are only available for animals that have been spayed and neutered.

Vaccines are available when your pet is here for surgery and on a walk-in basis. We do not offer check-ups or sick visits. We encourage you to establish a relationship with a full service veterinary hospital for those services.

Walk In Hours

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays
10 am – 3 pm


(Please note we cannot administer vaccinations during the vet’s half-hour lunch break) 

If You Are New To PAL

 • Bring proof of your pet’s spay/neuter surgery (Rabies Certificate, Vet Record, Etc.).
• Bring a list of the vaccinations and services your pet needs.
• If your pet needs a fecal exam, please bring a fecal sample.
• Your cat MUST be in a carrier and your dog MUST be on a leash. 

If You Are A Current Client

 • Bring proof of your pet’s spay/neuter surgery if they have not been here before.
• Bring a list of the vaccinations and services your pet needs.
• If your pet needs a fecal exam, please bring a fecal sample.
• Your cat MUST be in a carrier and your dog MUST be on a leash. 

FIV/FeLV Combo Test Information

We use the Idexx Laboratories FIV/FeLV Combo SNAP Test.

FIV stands for Feline immunodeficiency virus (the test detects antibodies).
FeLV stands for Feline leukemia virus (the test detects the antigen).

We will take a blood sample from your cat and run the test. It will give us results in 10 minutes, and we will alert you to any positive result. We do not call you if the test is negative for both FIV & FeLV unless you request it. Please make sure we have the phone number where you can be reached the day of surgery.

If your cat is positive for FIV or FeLV, you have two options:

  • You can request that we proceed with surgery & vaccinations as planned. (With the exception of the FeLV vaccine; we will not administer it if the cat is FeLV positive.)
  • Or, you can request that we humanely euthanize the cat for FeLV ONLY, FIV ONLY, or for both.

 Please familiarize yourself with these illnesses in the case that your cat tests positive for them. We want your decision to be well-informed and not rushed should they test positive. Because we do not want to add more stress for the cat, we need the answer as quickly as possible. We have very limited time until the cat recovers from anesthesia.

FeLV is usually spread when an uninfected cat comes in contact with the saliva or urine of an infected cat-while they groom each other, for example, or when they share food bowls or litter boxes. FIV, on the other hand, is most often spread when an infected cat bites an uninfected cat. A human cannot become infected with FIV or FeLV through contact with an infected cat. 

Find Out More About FeLV